Julie Golomb Looks at How Our Brains Make Sense of the World

Julie Golomb, Associate Professor of Psychology, researches the interactions between visual perception, attention, memory, and eye movements using human behavioral and computational cognitive neuroscience techniques. She’s especially interested in questions like, “How do our brains convert patterns of light into rich perceptual experiences, and what can we learn from perceptual errors?” For more of her discussion with David Staley, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Robin Judd Describes What Military Marriages Were Like After the Holocaust

Robin Judd, Associate Professor of History, explores how European and North African Jewish women met and married American, British, and Canadian soldiers and officers after the Holocaust in her latest book, Love, Liberation, and Loss: Jewish Military Marriages after the Holocaust. Her research illuminates how these couples developed relationships, what policies regulated their marriages, and what happened to the women when they moved to other countries with their husbands to face acculturation in the aftermath of trauma. For more of her discussion with David Staley, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Mari Noda: Learning a New Language is Performing as a Believable, Intelligent Person in a Culture

Mari Noda, Professor in Japanese in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, is a specialist in East Asian language pedagogy and is primarily interested in curriculum, material development, and assessment. She seeks to help students not only understand a language, but to use that language as a mechanism to participate in the culture.