Adélékè Adéẹ̀kọ́: Why Would Anybody Write an Ode to Palm Trees?

Dr. Adélékè Adéèkó, Humanities Distinguished Professor at The Ohio State University, discusses his book Arts of Being Yorùbá. Dr. Adéèkó delves into the cultural significance of Yorùbá proverbs, praise poetry, and fiction. He explains how these forms of expression define Yorùbá identity and addresses their use in modern forms like pictorial magazines. The conversation also touches on orature, a term coined to describe oral literature, and its impact on written texts. Dr. Adéèkó reveals his interest in 20th-century literary theory and how he integrates Derrida’s deconstruction into his work.

Anna Willow: No Such Thing as Distant Objectivity

Dr. Anna Willow, professor and engaged environmental anthropologist, focuses on human-environment relationships and resource conflicts. She joins David Staley to discuss her work on anti-clearcutting activism among the Anishinaabe people and her broader studies on industrial development impacts. She describes her publications on extractivism and alternative futures, emphasizing the role of anthropologists in envisioning and driving positive social and environmental change.

Unions, Social Media, and Social Movements: The Research of Andrew Martin

Andrew Martin, Professor of Sociology and Interim Associate Executive Dean for Undergraduate Education, studies working class mobilization and unions, particularly their use of social movement strategies. He’s also researched the ways in which groups collaborate to curb the growth of corporate power in America.

Dana Kletchka: Are Museums For Objects or People?

Dana Carlisle Kletchka, Assistant Professor in the Department of Arts Administration, Education and Policy, studies the history, theory, and philosophy of art museum education. Her research has examined museum practices and how art educators are treated in large institutional contexts. In addition, she looks at the surprisingly different roles and intentions of art educators and art historians in museums.

How Did Humans Evolve? Scott McGraw Explores This and More

Scott McGraw, Professor and Chair of the Department of Anthropology, is a researcher, biological anthropologist, evolutionary anatomist, and primate behavior analyst. He observes animals in the wild to see how their physical movements, for example, result from bone structures. Biological anthropologists then use this information to understand how extinct animals might have moved, such as our human ancestors.

Why Do People Write? Benjamin Hoffmann Thinks It’s About Posterity

Benjamin Hoffman – Associate Professor in the Department of French and Italian, Director of the Center for Excellence, and novelist – researches 18th-century French literature and philosophy, transatlantic studies, contemporary French literature, and creative writing. His recent publication is The Paradoxes of Posterity, a philosophical inquiry on the concept of posterity. He discusses this, digital humanities, and more with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence

Robert Holub Explains Nietzsche’s Jewish Problem

Robert Holub, Ohio Eminent Scholar and Professor and Chair of the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, studies 19th and 20th century intellectual, cultural, and literary history, especially Friedrich Nietzsche, Heinrich Heine, German realism, and literary and aesthetic theory. He discusses the historical setting of Nietzsche and how this impacts the ways we understand his writing.

Making the Inner Ear Cool: Eric Bielefeld

Eric Bielefeld, Professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Science, studies auditory physiology, especially inner ear pathology. His most recent work involves modeling how exposure to HIV medications during pregnancy influences the development of auditory systems and the impact of cooling the inner ear on chemotherapy efficacy.

Are Your Political Views Hereditary? Skylar Cranmer’s Brain Scan Research Suggests It Is

Skylar Cranmer, the Carter Phillips and Sue Henry Professor of Political Science, researches network science, such as forecasting the evolution of complex networks or exploring whether brain scans can predict political partisanship. He joins host David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence to discuss network science, which incorporates fields from political science to physics to mathematics to biology, among others.

How Do Cells Make Decisions?: Adriana Dawes Has Answers

Adriana Dawes, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Molecular Genetics, studies mathematical biology, mathematical modeling of cell polarization and chemotaxis, and differential equations. She traces how organisms control their grow from one to trillions of cells, which involves countless decisions about organization and function.

How a Highly Advanced Microscope is Like a Record Player, Jay Gupta

Jay Gupta, Professor of Physics, explores the properties of novel materials at the atomic scale to address problems in energy conversion and advanced computing. Via scanning tunneling microscopy, his group examine items that are a billionth of a meter. For more of his discussion of nanomaterials, semiconductors and how to spell your name in atoms, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

“We Are Interested in Creating Understanding:” Jennifer Willging On Cultural Studies

Jennifer Willging, Associate Professor and Interim Chair of the Department of French and Italian, specializes in 20th and 21st century French literature and culture. Her work explores literature that attempts to understand contemporary society and important influences, such as technology.

John Low On Understanding the Importance of the Newark Earthworks

John Low, Associate Professor of Comparative Studies and Director of the Newark Earthworks Center, studies American Indian histories, literatures, religions, and cultures, and native environmental perspectives and practices, among other areas. He joins David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence to discuss the Newark Earthworks and what makes the two remaining mounds so special, on par with Stonehenge.

Andrea Sims On What Can and Can’t Be a Word

Andrea Sims, Associate Professor in the Departments of Linguistics and Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures, studies theoretical morphology, meaning what kinds of words and structures can exist in a particular language. She explores what speakers know, often unconsciously, about what is possible in their language.

“I Fell in Love with Mountain Glaciers as a Mountaineer,” Bryan Mark

Bryan Mark, Professor of Geography, studies climate-glacier-hydrologic dynamics over different time scales and serves as State Climatologist of Ohio. He joins David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Meg Daly On Why Animals Choose Their Habitat

Meg Daly, Professor of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology, studies animal systematics and ecology, serving as Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education. She’s particularly interested in studying how and why marine animals live where they do, most recently looking at sea anemones that live in temperate marine intertidal ecosystems.

“Our Annual Conference is Like the Bar in Star Wars,” Says Peter Mansoor

Peter Mansoor, Professor and General Raymond E. Mason, Jr., Chair of Military History, researches modern U.S. military history, World War II, the Iraq War, and counterinsurgency warfare. He discusses his most recent research on the 1944-1945 liberation of the Philippines, the five types of military history, and the surprising breadth of attendees at military history conferences on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Julie Golomb Looks at How Our Brains Make Sense of the World

Julie Golomb, Associate Professor of Psychology, researches the interactions between visual perception, attention, memory, and eye movements using human behavioral and computational cognitive neuroscience techniques. She’s especially interested in questions like, “How do our brains convert patterns of light into rich perceptual experiences, and what can we learn from perceptual errors?”

Robin Judd Describes What Military Marriages Were Like After the Holocaust

Robin Judd, Associate Professor of History, explores how European and North African Jewish women met and married American, British, and Canadian soldiers and officers after the Holocaust in her latest book, Love, Liberation, and Loss: Jewish Military Marriages after the Holocaust. Her research illuminates how these couples developed relationships, what policies regulated their marriages, and what happened to the women when they moved to other countries with their husbands to face acculturation in the aftermath of trauma.

Ludmila Isurin On the Production of Collective Memory Versus History

Ludmila Isurin, Professor in the Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures, is an interdisciplinary scholar with multiple affiliations within Ohio State. Her latest book is Collective Remembering: Memory in the World and in the Mind, which she discusses with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Mari Noda: Learning a New Language is Performing as a Believable, Intelligent Person in a Culture

Mari Noda, Professor in Japanese in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, is a specialist in East Asian language pedagogy and is primarily interested in curriculum, material development, and assessment. She seeks to help students not only understand a language, but to use that language as a mechanism to participate in the culture.

Different Languages Follow Similar Evolutions, Says Brian Joseph

Brian Joseph, Distinguished University Professor of Linguistics and the Kenneth E. Naylor Professor of South Slavic Languages and Linguistics, studies historical linguistics, the history of the Greek language, language contact, Greek, Albanian, and Balkan linguistics, and Sanskrit. He’s especially interested in the way that the similar experiences that cultures have with language influence how their language develops.

Think You Know the Classical World? Think Again, Says Carolina Lopez-Ruiz

Carolina Lopez-Ruiz, Professor of Classics, studies ancient Greek literature and classical mythology, and Greek and Near Eastern interaction and colonization. She strives to show that this period was more than just traditional Greek influences, with many cultures interacting and influencing each other.

Prof. Zhengyu Liu on Using the Past to Predict the Future of Climate Dynamics

Zhengyu Liu is the Max Thomas Professor of Climate Dynamics in the Department of Geography. His areas of expertise include climate change, Earth systems modeling, and climate dynamics. He discusses how scientists can have confidence in their predictions about the future of climate on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

The Tension Between the Practical and the Impractical: Reitter Describes the Crisis in Humanities

Paul Reitter, Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures, studies German-Jewish culture, the history of higher education, modernism, and critical theory, among other areas. His most recent book, co-authored with Chad Wellmon, is Permanent Crisis: The Humanities in a Disenchanted Age, which examines the long history of the Humanities being described in terms of crisis.

Miranda Martinez Describes the Best Way to Save for Retirement

Miranda Martinez, an Associate Professor in the Department of Comparative Studies, researches race and public policy and economic, sociological, and cultural economies, among other areas. She looks at the impact of financial coaching in communities of color and how having an automated monthly savings plan can be a significant benefit over having to decide consciously to save every month.

What Is It to Know Something, and Do Dogs Have Knowledge? Declan Smithies knows

Declan Smithies, Professor and Director of Philosophy Graduate Studies, researches what it means to know something and to have consciousness. His book, The Epistemic Role of Consciousness, argues that consciousness gives humans knowledge of the external world and that without consciousness, we wouldn’t know anything. Since a dog can know whether there’s food in its bowl by perceiving its bowl, Smithies says, “it’s very plausible that the conscious experience of seeing or smelling the food in the bowl can give dogs knowledge.”

How Do People Make Difficult Decisions? Dana Howard Has Decided on an Answer.

Dana Howard, Assistant Professor of Philosophy with an appointment in the Ohio State Center for Bioethics, researches medical care, often in palliative and internal medicine, to discover how information is shared and decisions reached. She shares her research with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

From Florida to the Antarctic: W. Berry Lyons’ Scientific Journey

W. Berry Lyons, Professor and Distinguished University Scholar in the Ohio State School of Earth Sciences, was born and raised in the sunny state of Florida, but much of his career has been focused on the decidedly colder Antarctic, where he’s researched the impact of climate and climate change on the McMurdo Dry Valleys, the continent’s largest ice-free area. 

Who Were the First Americans? Mark Hubbe Has Some Suggestions

Professor of Anthropology Mark Hubbe studies modern human dispersion with a special emphasis on the settlement of South America. He joins host David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence to discuss how the Americas were inhabited, what makes archeological evidence for human settlements controversial, and what methods are used to explore these questions.

What Makes Us Sick? Daniel Wozniak Looks at the Causes

Daniel Wozniak, Professor of Microbial Infection and Immunity and Microbiology, studies bacterial pathogenesis and gene regulation. He joins David Staley to discuss his research that seeks to determine how bacteria live in human hosts and what kinds of treatment can stop their growth.

An Economist and a Geographer Meet in a Forest…: Research by Darla Munroe

Professor Darla Munroe, Chair of the Department of Geography, studies land economics and human geography, with a focus on human environment interactions at a landscape level. She joins David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence to discuss her work on the forests of southeast Ohio and the methodological distinctions between economists and geographers, among other topics.

The Quirks of Quarks and Other Aspects of Quantum Mechanics with Yuri Kovchegov

Yuri Kovchegov, Professor of Physics at The Ohio State University, studies quantum chromodynamics at high energy and nuclear theory, and was recently named to the 2020 class of Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He breaks down some of the intricacies of quantum mechanics with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Jennifer Suchland on the Role of the Scholar in Society

Associate Professor in the Department of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and the Department of Slavic and East European Languages and Cultures Jennifer Suchland is a 2020 Mellon/American Council of Learned Societies Scholars and Society Fellow. She describes how the role of scholars in society is also the role of education in society, especially democracies. Her current research focuses on the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, which she discusses with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Professor Susan Van Pelt Petry on turning COVID-19 into 19ChoreOVIDs

When Dance Professor Susan Van Pelt Petry began working from home due to the pandemic, her interest in staying hopeful as an artist led her to begin creating 19 choreographed videos, aka 19ChoreOVIDs, a play on COVID-19. She describes these videos and more of her work with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Voices of Excellence Hits the Century Mark!

Voices of Excellence will release its 100th episode on November 18th. Join host David Staley as Olivia Miltner from ASC Marketing and Communication talks to him about interviewing dozens of faculty members in the College of Arts and Sciences, what he’s learned about interdisciplinary in the college, and what he hopes listeners gain from the podcast. For more of her discussion with David Staley, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Building Capacity: Joni Acuff on Collectives, Movement Work and the Arts

Joni Acuff is an Associate Professor, Graduate Studies Chair, and Diversity Chair in the Department of Arts Administration, Education and Policy. Recently, she’s been researching the collective work of artists and art educators of color, with an eye to recognizing and supporting emerging social justice collectives and coalitions.

Pioneering in the Language Program Director Field: Holly Nibert

Holly Nibert, Associate Professor of Hispanic Linguistics and Language Program Director in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, researches phonology and phonetics, the acquisition of a second language sound system, and the principles and practices of second language classroom instruction. Recently, she’s been writing a book about how to be a language program director, in an effort to help professionalize the position.

Newspaper Ads Are a Great Way to Learn About a Culture: Treva Lindsey

Associate Professor Treva Lindsey of the Department of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies specializes in African American women’s history, Black popular and expressive culture, Black feminism(s), hip hop studies, critical race and gender theory, and sexual politics. She researched Black women’s beauty culture by delving into newspapers from the late 19th and early 20th centuries for ads to learn how products were advertised, who advertised them, and who were the models, among other questions.

Scott Swearingen: It’s More Than Gunning Down Zombies

Scott Swearingen, Assistant Professor in the Department of Design, studies game design, collaborative gaming, and animation, and worked as a game designer on award-winning games and franchises, including Medal of Honor, The Simpsons, and The Sims. He talks with David Staley about how games define our culture and why he values face-to-face interactions that games can engage.

Jennifer Brello on Helping Patients Learn to Speak Again

Jennifer Brello, Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Science, serves as the Director of the Ohio State University Aphasia Initiative, a free program for people living with loss of communication ability due to brain injury. Aphasia can make mundane tasks like ordering a cup of coffee very challenging, and Brello describes to host David Staley the benefits of therapy at the institute on this week’s episode of Voices of Excellence.

Julia Nelson Hawkins on Researching a Pandemic While Living in One

Julia Nelson Hawkins, Associate Professor in the Department of Classics, leads a group of clinicians and humanities scholars in the Discovery Themes-funded project “Humanities in the Pandemic” that seeks to increase academia and public awareness about the role that arts and humanities play in global health crises. She talks with David Staley about the project and what we can learn from previous pandemics on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Shannon Winnubst on “The Past That Is Never Past:” Anti-Blackness & Anti-Indigeneity

Shannon Winnubst, Professor and Chair of the Department of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, researches queer and trans studies, race theory, psychoanalytic theory, and 20th century French theory. Energized by the Black Lives Matter movement, she talks about new language that is emerging in the public sphere to name systemic racism and the deeper encounter it offers, especially for white persons and institutions, with the centuries-long violence. For more of her discussion with David Staley, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Katra Byram Asks “How Do Germans Regard the Mothers of World War II?”

Associate Professor of Germanic Languages and Literature, Katra Byram, is a core member of Project Narrative and co-editor of The Ohio State University Press book series. Her current research examines the complicated and, for her, ambivalent roles played by German mothers and grandmothers in post-war German literature. For more of her discussion with David Staley, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Nicholas Breyfogle on the Impact of Discounting Russia in 1991

“There was a time after the end of the Soviet Union in 1991 where Americans, others in Europe, and other places in the world discounted Russia as a global power. And this was a mistake,” says Nicholas Breyfogle, Associate Professor, Director of the Goldberg Center, and an expert on Russian and Soviet history and global environmental history, especially the history of water. Listen in as he describes the impact of this mistake all the way to our current times on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Judson Jeffries: Why the BLM Protests Look New

Judson Jeffries, Professor of African American and African Studies, researches media studies, public policy, Homeland Security, African American politics, and police-community relations. He sees the BLM protests as having a new kind of participant and perhaps a new kind of possibility for success. For more of his discussion with David Staley, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Kristi Williams Discusses How 60% of U.S. Adults Experience Trauma Before 18

Williams, a Professor in the Department of Sociology, researches the influence of family and other personal relationships on mental and physical health, with a particular focus on gender and life course variations in those patterns. She is particularly interested in exploring how the more trauma people experience, the worse their health is and how that can be treated. For more of her discussion with David Staley, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

The Ethical Significance of Reading, According to Prof. Ashley Hope Pérez

How readers engage with what they encounter in reading has ethical significance, says Ashley Hope Pérez, Assistant Professor of Comparative Studies. In addition to having written three novels, she researches fiction with an eye to how it shapes the way that readers respond to others in the real world. For more of her discussion with David Staley, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Heather Allen and Researching the Underpinnings of Science

Heather Allen, Dow Professor and Ohio State Distinguished Scholar in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, researches molecular organization, ion pairing, and hydration at aqueous interfaces. She describes her work as taking the very basic units of life and asking, “How do they respond to an electric field or slight changes in pH and environment?” Listen in to her discussion with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Reconstruction, Green Books, and Representation: Prof. Trevon Logan on African American History

Trevon Logan, Hazel C. Youngberg Trustees Distinguished Professor of Economics and Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, researches economic history, economic demography, and applied micro economics. He joins David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence to discuss the economic history of African Americans.

Elena Foulis, Podcaster: “Every Time I Interview a Person…I’m Learning Something”

Elena Foulis, Coordinator for the Spanish for Heritage Language program in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and host of the Ohio Habla podcast, joins David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence. She discusses her work as a public humanist, how she engages students in her classes, and what she learns hosting her very popular podcast.

Never the Same Word Twice: Cynthia Clopper on the Uniqueness of Pronunciation

Cynthia Clopper, Professor and Chair of the Department of Linguistics, researches speech sounds: how we produce them, their acoustic characteristics, and their perception by listeners. She says that every time we say a word, like “cat,” it’s subtly different. For more of her discussion with David Staley, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Elizabeth Cooksey and the Survey That Launched 10,000 Articles

Professor of Sociology Elizabeth Cooksey studies social demography, life course transitions, and the development of youth and children. She also serves as the Director of the Center for Human Resource Research, which started the first national longitudinal survey 55 years ago. The data from the study has been used in thousands of articles, and Cooksey describes how it works to David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Laura Kubatko: It’s An Exciting Time to Be Working in Biology

Professor Laura Kubatko, from the Department of Statistics and the Department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology, is amazed by the advances she’s seen in her career in how scientists translate “observations into formal mathematical or statistical models.” Moreover, this is, for her, the “fun part,” because they collaborate to explain “why [we] think [an event] is happening.” She describes these developments and more with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Why Did the Chicken Cross the Road? Laura Wagner Says It Had a Story to Tell

Professor of Psychology Laura Wagner studies how children acquire language and learn about meaning, such as the progression of time in storytelling. Their interpretations of even simple stories like the famous chicken joke reveal hidden meanings about complicated linguistics and complex concepts of time. She discusses this and more with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Barry Green invites you to join the Inner Game of Music

The School of Music’s Barry Green has served as the Principal Bassist for the Cincinnati Symphony, the California Symphony, and the Sun Valley Idaho Summer Symphony. His book, The Inner Game of Music, has sold over a quarter of a million copies . He shares his thoughts on music, musicianship, and how to drown out the negative thoughts in your head so you can play better music with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Prof. Meow Hui Goh On How People Experience the Collapse of a Society

Meow Hui Goh, an Associate Professor of Chinese in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, researches medieval Chinese literature, medieval Chinese literary and cultural history, memory and text in medieval China, and the instrumentality of medieval Chinese literature. She is completing a new book manuscript, The Double Life of Chaos: Living Memory and Literature in Early Medieval China, 180s–300s, which covers the collapse of the Han Dynasty. For more of her discussion with David Staley, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Gina Osterloh On the Pressure of Looking

Gina Osterloh, Assistant Professor of Art, sees her photographic practice as embodying the printed image, drawing, film, and performance as it explores the resonances between the physical body and its representational imprint, trace or stand in. For more of her discussion with David Staley, including her insight in role of looking and vision in creating one’s identity, as well as being a site of tremendous pressure and pleasure, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Prof. Ola Ahlqvist Tells Us How to See the Forest For the Trees

Professor of Geography, Associate Vice Provost for Academic Enrichment, and Executive Director of the Honors and Scholars Center, Ola Ahlqvist studies cartography, land cover change, geographic information, and online maps. He also looks at the impact that the definition of terms has on research, such as what defines a forest. Listen to his discussion of this and more with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Jim Phelan Describes the Power of Narrative

Distinguished University Professor and Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor in the Department of English, Jim Phelan, also serves as Director of Medical Humanities and Director of Project Narrative. He joins David Staley to define narrative theory, identify the many audiences built into narratives, and discuss how “narrative competence enhances medical competence.” For more of his research, listen to this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Professor Brad Bushman: Mythbuster

“I want people to base their beliefs on research evidence rather than hunches,” says Brad Bushman, Professor of Communication and the Margaret Hall and Robert Randal Rinehart Chair of Mass Communication. Bushman studies the causes, consequences, and solutions to the problem of human aggression and violence, and shares his insights with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Prof. Piperata Looks at the Impact on Health of Adapting to Your Circumstances

Associate professor of anthropology Barbara Piperata applies an evolutionary and critical biocultural perspective to the study of nutritional anthropology, food security, and reproductive energetics. She’s especially interested in what happens to people’s health as they adapt to their circumstances. She explains her findings to David Staley on this week’s episode.

Finding a Celestial Needle in a “Haystack” of Similar Needles: Scott Gaudi’s Dilemma

Scott Gaudi, Thomas Jefferson Professor for Discovery and Space Exploration and University Distinguished Scholar in the Department of Astronomy, is an expert on extrasolar planets and astrobiology. His work with the KELT, Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope, led to the discovery of several planets. He discusses this and more with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence

Making App-ropriate Dance: Hannah Kosstrin describes the KineScribe Program

Hannah Kosstrin, Associate Professor of Dance, researches dance, Jewish, and gender studies. She is Project Director for KineScribe, a Labanotation iPad app supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Tune in to hear her discussion of the app and how dance movements are recorded on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Morality is a Product of Our Emotions, Says Justin D’Arms

Professor of Philosophy, Justin D’Arms, researches moral theory, meta ethics, reason and rationality, evolutionary theory and the philosophy of emotion. His forthcoming book, Rational Sentimentalism, is an “articulation and defense of sentimentalist theory of value.” Listen to his talk with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

“Columbus Is Perfectly Poised Right Now to Do Something That Toronto Initiated” – Goldberg-Miller

An Assistant Professor in the Department of Arts Administration, Education and Policy, Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller researches arts and cultural entrepreneurship and creative economic development, among other areas. She argues that, like Toronto did a few years ago, Columbus is ready to implement a cultural plan to guide its development. Hear more of her discussion with host David Staley on Voices of Excellence.

Do You Form a Mental Image of a Podcast Host? Kathryn Campbell-Kibler Has Research For You

Kathryn Campbell-Kibler, an Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics, researches sociolinguistic variation, small differences in pronunciation, word choice, and syntactic structures that listeners use to form an impression of a speaker. She also discusses her “See Your Speech” linguistics project, an interactive website that gives users visual displays based on acoustic analysis of their own speech. Listen to her discussion with host David Staley on Voices of Excellence

What Popular Soft Drink Gets its Caffeine from Waste Tea Leaves and Coal? Bart Elmore Knows

Bart Elmore, Associate Professor of History, is a core faculty member of the Ohio State Sustainability Institute and author of the book Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca Cola Capitalism. He joins David Staley this week on Voices to discuss the history and business practices of large companies like Coca Cola, Monsanto, and Bayer.

Which Supreme Court Justice did Executive Dean Gretchen Ritter Interview?

Gretchen Ritter joins David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence to discuss the “amazing experience” of interviewing a sitting Supreme Court Justice and to describe her vision for the College of Arts and Sciences: encouraging more full-time students, promoting the value of a liberal arts education, and creating lifelong learners, among others.

Susan Melsop Describes How to Turn a Bridge Into a Community Resource Center

When São Paulo, Brazil, gifted an empty 12,000 square foot building to the city’s homeless, a world of opportunities and needs was created. Susan Melsop, an Associate Professor in the Ohio State Department of Design, had recently received the Ronald and Deborah Ratner Distinguished Teaching Award, which gave her the opportunity to create a social impact design project abroad. Over the course of several months, she developed academic and NGO partnerships in Brazil and formed a design class to illustrate how design can be an agent for change and social justice.

From Hammer to Nutcrackers to Pins: The Increasing Sophistication of Math with Roman Holowinsky

Math has been studied for thousands of years, so what could be left to discover? Plenty says Roman Holowinsky, associate professor of mathematics and the managing director and co-founder of the Erdős Institute. He studies analytic number theory and aims to find the simplest and most elegant way to accomplish a proof. He discusses math and more this week with David Staley on Voices of Excellence.

The Data About Your Steak Purchase Is More Valuable Than the Steak: Thomas Wood

Thomas Wood is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science who has worked on political campaigns such as Jeb Bush’s presidential run. He studies data use in campaigns and advertisement and shares with David Staley that the fact that a consumer has bought a mail order steak is more valuable than the actual steak sale, since this data can be sold to businesses that target this population.

Nandini Trivedi: How To Make Electrons Flow (Nearly) Forever

Ohio State University Professor of Physics Nandini Trivedi works in the area of theoretical physics, specifically on quantum Monte Carlo simulations, condensed matter theory, and cold atoms. She joins David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence to discuss how the rules of physics change when the scales get very small in quantum physics. Dr. Trivedi will also be the featured speaker at the December 1 Science Sundays event: https://artsandsciences.osu.edu/research/science-sundays

Theodora Dragostinova: “We Realized Change Might Be Possible Because the Tanks Did Not Show Up”

Department of History Associate Professor Theodora Dragostinova researches nation-building, refugee movements, and minority politics in Eastern Europe, with a particular emphasis on the Balkans. The 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall has given her a chance to reconsider the events around this historical occasion and she discusses them with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence podcast.

Anna Gawboy on Realizing a Revolutionary Symphonic Vision From 1910

Anna Gawboy, Associate Professor in the School of Music at The Ohio State University College of the Arts and Sciences, researches the intersection of music theory, cultural history and multimedia with a special focus on visualized music. She has researched and staged Russian composer Alexander Scriabin’s Prometheus, Poem of Fire, an audiovisual composition well ahead of its time that included lighting and pyrotechnics.

Amy Youngs Wants You to Get Inside of Photographs

Amy Youngs, an Associate Professor in the Department of Art at The Ohio State University College of the Arts and Sciences, creates biological art, interactive sculptures, and digital media works that explore relationships between technology and our changing concept of nature and self. Her exhibit at The Ohio State Urban Arts Center features photographs of Flushing Meadows, Corona Park that have been mapped into three-dimensional space, so viewers “feel like [they’re] there… and see these photographs as almost objects that [they] can pick up and move around.”

Two Million Photos, 150 Years: Time and Change at Ohio State

The Ohio State University Archives has a huge number of photographs, events, and stories that could have been included in the Ohio State University Press’s recent book Time and Change: 150 Years of The Ohio State University. The group behind the book–Tamar Chute, University Archivist; Tony SanFilippo, director of The Ohio State University Press; and Paul Nini, professor in the department of design–recently sat down with David Staley on Voices of Excellence to talk about the decisions that went into the production of the book.

Statistical Modeling Can Coax More Information Out of Medical Studies, Says Elly Kaizar

Statistical modeling can reveal many hidden facts, such as the best time to start certain treatments for childhood traumatic brain injuries. Elly Kaizar, Professor of Statistics, has shown that statistically combining data from several sources gives us the opportunity to learn more about treatment effectiveness as it varies with different treatment implementations and across populations. Prof. Kaizar discusses this topic and more ways statistical analyses can mitigate imperfect data collection with host David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Do You Laugh or Cry When a Character Cries on Screen? Asks Laura Podalsky

Professor and Chair of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at The Ohio State University College of the Arts and Sciences Laura Podalsky specializes in Latin American film and cultural studies and researches the relationship between Latin American culture, politics and socio-historical formations. Her latest project examines how films encourage us to respond with empathy or laughter to character emotions. 

“Are Longer Commutes Necessarily Inefficient?” Morton O’Kelly Says Not Necessarily

Morton O’Kelly, Professor of Geography and Divisional Dean for the Social and Behavioral Sciences at The Ohio State University College of the Arts and Sciences, is fascinated by how things and people get from one place to another. He discusses whether Columbus is a more efficient city than San Diego or Las Vegas and if airlines that use point-to-point versus hub-and-spoke networks save or cost you money.

United States Nearly as Politically Polarized as Post-Civil War Mozambique: Paul Beck

Paul Beck, Professor Emeritus of Political Science in the College of the Arts and Sciences, co-coordinates the Comparative National Election Project, which surveys voters in dozens of countries to compare their views. He talks with David Staley about what the project reveals about democracies, including the United States, on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

Prof. John Beacom: Science Is Not About Trying to Memorize What’s in a Book

This week on Voices of Excellence, Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy John Beacom describes neutrinos, the fun part of science–learning something new–and the importance of science outreach for introducing young people to the field. To this end, Beacom leads the college’s Science Sundays events, which begin this Sunday at 3 PM at the Ohio Union U.S. Bank Conference Theater. 

Why Are We Fascinated by Horrifying or Sad Stories? Michael Slater Has Some Thoughts

Director of the School of Communications and distinguished professor Michael Slater has researched media influence on youth behavior, as well as the impact of social media on its users. He talks with David Staley about his research on this week’s Voices of Excellence.

The Foundation of All Universities Is in Arts and Sciences, Says Professor Janet Box-Steffensmeier

Janet Box-Steffensmeier stepped down as the Interim Executive Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at The Ohio State University in July to return to being the Vernal Riffe Professor of Political Science. She joins David Staley to discuss the extension of the university’s land grant mission and her return to studying coalition behavior in politics.

Diaspora, Beyoncé, and Law School: Prof. Simone Drake’s Academic Journeys

Simone Drake, Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of African American and African Studies, discusses her latest book, When We Imagine Grace: Black Men and Subject Making, with David Staley on the next Voices of Excellence.

Jim Fowler Sees Math Everywhere

“It encompasses practically everything I do in some capacity or another,” he tells David Staley on the Voices of Excellence podcast. Fowler, an Assistant Professor of mathematics at The Ohio State University College of the Arts and Sciences, researches geometry and topology and uses computational techniques to attack problems in pure mathematics. 

Asteroids Isn’t Just Fun to Play; It Has Great Physics, Says Professor Chris Orban

An Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics, Chris Orban specializes in computational physics and uses video games like Asteroids and Angry Birds to demonstrate coding and physics to his freshman classes at the Marion campus. He discusses both with David Staley on the Voices of Excellence podcast.

What’s French? Prof. Danielle Marx-Scouras Moves Us Beyond Paris

When Americans think of France, they often think of Paris. But many other locations and cultures thrive in France, such as the Toulousain rock band Zebda, whose activities French & Italian Professor Danielle Marx-Scouras chronicles in her book La France de Zebda. She discusses French culture and politics with David Staley on the Voices of Excellence podcast.

Karen Hutzel Describes the Making of Art and Cultural Policy

Associate Professor Karen Hutzel is Chair of the Department of Arts Administration, Education and Policy and interim Chair of the Department of Art. She recently discussed cultural policy and collaborative art making with David Staley on the Voices of Excellence podcast.

Hearing Loss Can Slow Learning to Read, Says Prof. Gail Whitelaw

Gail Whitelaw, Clinical Associate Professor of Audiology in the Department of Speech and Hearing Science, joins David Staley on Voices of Excellence to discuss audiology, the importance of early hearing loss detection, and the impact of hearing loss on learning to read. 

Tomorrow, The World: Vice Provost Gil Latz Describes the Global Reach of The Ohio State University

As the Vice Provost for Global Strategies and International Affairs, Professor of Geography Gil Latz leads development of Ohio State’s global engagement strategy: international research partnerships, recruitment of international students, and study abroad. With regional offices in Shanghai, China; Sao Paulo, Brazil; and Mumbai, India, and areas in between, Ohio State’s global presence must be handled carefully and grown, a primary responsibility of Dr. Latz’s leadership appointment in the Office of Academic Affairs.

The Case of the Murderer Caught by Speech Scientist Robert Fox

In addition to his many publications and academic achievements, Professor and Chair of the Department of Speech and Hearing Science Robert Fox consults about forensic phonetics, including a 2003 murder trial that was resolved with his expertise and audiology technology. Listen in for his discussion with David Staley on the Voices of Excellence podcast.

Screening Trafficking: Yana Hashamova Describes Media Depictions of Human Trafficking

Films and TV productions about human trafficking made by Eastern and Western European companies don’t differ in outlook as much as one might expect. Yana Hashamova’s latest book, Screening Trafficking, looks at this topic through a cultural lens. Listen in for her discussion with David Staley on the Voices of Excellence podcast.

Why Do Viewers Find TV Mobsters So Attractive? Prof. Dana Renga Has a Theory

A sympathetic treatment of people who do horrible things seems hard to justify. So why are such depictions so common with mafia movies and tv, especially in Italy? Professor Dana Renga’s new book Watching Sympathetic Perpetrators on Italian Television offers the first comprehensive study of recent, popular Italian television. Learn about her research findings on Voices of Excellence from the Arts and Sciences with David Staley.

How Did U.S. Supreme Court Justices Divide Along Party Lines? Lawrence Baum Knows

We tend to think of a Supreme Court in which Justices divide along party lines as the way it’s always been. But that’s not the case, according to legal scholar Lawrence Baum, whose research points to these party-line divisions as being a relatively recent phenomenon. Hear his discussion on Voices of Excellence from the Arts and Sciences with David Staley.

Controlling Your Microbes: Michael Ibba

Humans have at least as many microbial as human cells on and in their bodies. These microbes can be beneficial or destructive, and Professor Michael Ibba describes what happens when these microbes get out of control through antibiotic resistance and how Ohio State is working for better health outcomes.

Professor Barry Shank Says Musical Beauty Builds Community

Professor Shank’s latest book explores the power of music to create community, and he discusses this along with a history of Comparative Studies and how greeting cards maintain social connections on Voices of Excellence from the Arts and Sciences with David Staley.

Provost: Ohio State Should Be In ‘The Room Where It Happens’

Citing the song from Hamilton, Provost Bruce A. McPheron says Ohio State should be “in the room where it happens” for higher education topics, ranging from the student experience to teaching and learning. Listen to the Voices of Excellence from the Arts and Sciences podcast to hear McPheron discuss his work with David Staley.

How Did Precious Lapis Lazuli End Up on the Teeth of a Medieval Nun? Alison Beach Has Some Ideas

When researchers studying the teeth of a medieval woman excavated in a dig near Dalheim, Germany found something strange, they knew the right person to call: Professor Alison Beach. Her expertise in twelfth-century female scribes helped to document that women were heavily involved in the creation of illuminated manuscripts. Hear more about her fascinating work on the Voices of Excellence from the College of Arts and Sciences podcast.

Professor Osei Appiah Describes How We Move Beyond Racial Prejudice to Form a More Perfect Union

News images of racial conflict are contradicted by the fact that society is becoming increasingly progressive and accepting of diversity. One key indicator of progress may be increasing instances of mediated interracial interaction, facilitated though a process of cultural voyeurism. Join Professor and Associate Director Osei Appiah in a conversion about this concept and more on the Voices of Excellence from the College of Arts and Sciences podcast.

Cultivation of Corn Caused Problems for Early Humans, Says Clark Larsen

As humans transitioned from hunter-gatherers to farmers, their diet influenced their health greatly. Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Clark Larson’s research shows that “in much of North America, wherever corn agriculture happens relatively late in pre-history, health begins to decline.”

What Do Spanish, Quechua, and DACA Have In Common? A Linguist Named Babel

Anna Babel, Associate Professor of Hispanic Linguistics in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, spent 17 years gathering ethnographic data for her 2018 book, Language at the Border of the Andes and the Amazon. She discusses how language use creates similarities and differences among speakers of Spanish and Quechua with host David Staley. She then turns to a topic closer to home, her experience leading ally trainings for campus community members interested in supporting undocumented students.

Can’t Make Decisions? Prof. Ellen Peters’ Research Can Help You Understand Why

Ellen Peters, Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Director of the Decision Sciences Collaborative, joins David Staley to discuss judgment, decision making and choice architecture, as well as Prof. Peters’ forthcoming book, Innumeracy in the Wild: Misunderstanding and Misusing Numbers.

Bord(hers) Around Bodies: Professor Lucille Toth Describes the Power of Dance

Going through an airport security checkpoint calls for people to enact the same physical movements. The Bord(hers) improvisational dance project created by Lucille Toth, assistant professor of French at The Ohio State University Newark campus, aims to explore these motions and ask how borders impact immigrants.

Harvey Miller Uses New Mobility Data to Understand Cities and Transportation

Trucks, buses, autonomous cars, scooters and bikes: everyone is crowding onto roadways. Professor and Chair of Geographic Information Science in the Department of Geography Harvey Miller talks with David Staley about how GIS can help make sense of it all. 

Jennifer Schlueter: Making Found Text into Theatrical Events

So you’ve found a 28-volume transcription of a 1920s spiritualist who believed a thwarted seventeenth century authoress spoke through her. What do you do? Theatre Professor Jennifer Schlueter’s approach with this and other texts is to work with collaborators to create performance events built out of archival material. Listen in as she describes her process and how, with experimental work, sometimes failure is the best teacher.

Scientific Curiosity Is in the Blood Says Irina Artsimovich

Her grandfather is credited with saying “Science is a way to pursue one’s sense of inquiry at the expense of the State,” so it’s no surprise that Irina Artsimovich has a passion for science, including “trying to channel [her curiosity] to find new antibiotics because we desperately need them.” 

Claudia Buchmann Looks At Gender Reversal In Higher Education

Over the past 50 years, the percentage of women attaining degrees in higher education has risen to 56% of all college degrees. Professor Buchmann discusses the history and impact of this change with David Staley on Voices of Excellence from the College of Arts and Sciences.

Professor Mytheli Sreenivas Asks: “Are Families Primarily Economic or Emotional Units?”

Mytheli Sreenivas, Associate Professor in the Department of History and Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies, describes her research and her award-winning book, Wives, Widows, Concubines: The Conjugal Family Ideal in Colonial India, with David Staley on this week’s Voices of Excellence from the College of Arts and Sciences.

Wendy Smooth On the Impact of Race and Gender on Legislators’ Power

“If you don’t have a seat at the table, bring a folding chair.” Join Wendy Smooth, Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion as she discusses her research into the roles that race and gender play in establishing influence in legislatures.

What’s the Intersection of War and Math? It’s Where Bear Braumoeller’s Research Happens

Join Bear Braumoeller and host David Staley for a discussion of how data analytics apply to geopolitics, including those times when the computer models fail to account for the actions of global players in maintaining international order.

Not Your Grandparents’ English, Says Janice Aski

Janice Aski

“I’m fascinating with how languages change,” says French and Italian Professor Janice Aski. Join her and David Staley for a discussion of the ways that languages change and why interest in learning another language is decreasing in the United States at exactly the time it needs to be increasing.

Yuan-Ming Lu Describes the Surprising Connection Between the Avengers’ Thanos and Condensed Matter

Ohio State University Physics Professor Yuan-Ming Lu is a National Science Foundation Career Award winner and a condensed matter theorist. Tune in to learn more about this fascinating field when Professor Lu talks to David Staley on Voices of Excellence from the College of Arts and Sciences.

Ann Hamilton’s Creativity Secret? Work Comes from Paying Attention

The work of Ohioan, visual artist, and educator Ann Hamilton has been described as “internationally recognized for the sensory surrounds of her large-scale multi-media installations.” She joins host David Staley to discuss her work including her latest installation, at the Cortlandt -World Trade Center Station, called CHORUS.

Abraham Badu Looks for Affordable Diagnostic Tools

Professor Abraham Badu-Tawiah is an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at the Ohio State University where he studies photochemistry in droplets and disease diagnosis. He’s a recipient of an Early Career Award from the Department of Energy, an Eli Lilly Young Investigator Award in Analytical Chemistry, and most recently an American Chemical Society Division of Analytical Chemistry Arthur F. Findeis Award for Achievements by a Young Analytical Scientist.

Michael Neblo is Optimistic about Democracy

Michael Neblo is an Associate Professor in the Ohio State University Department of Political Science, an affiliated faculty in the department of philosophy, and the Director of the Institute for Democratic Engagement and Accountability (IDEA). His research focuses on deliberative democracy and political psychology. His new book, Politics with the People: Building a Directly Representative Democracy, develops and tests a new model of politics connecting citizens and elected officials to improve representative government.